Thomas G. WitkopLaw Offices

Law Offices

Legal Poetry

John W Davis (April 13, 1873 – March 24, 1955) was an American politician, diplomat and lawyer. He served as a United States Representative from West Virginia (1911–1913), then as Solicitor General of the United States and U.S. Ambassador to the UK under President Woodrow Wilson. Over a 60-year legal career, he argued 140 cases before the U.S. Supreme Court.
Davis is best known as the Democratic Party nominee for President of the United States during the 1924 presidential election, losing to Republican incumbent Calvin Coolidge. Obviously he had a long and distinguished career. I like him for a poem that he wrote:

The lawyer's a man of sorrow, and acquainted with grief;
among all the sinners, he's considered the chief.
His friends all admire him when he conquers for them;
when he chances to lose, they're quick to condemn.
They say, "he is bought!" If he loses a case;
they say, "ah! He is crooked!" If he wins in the race.
If he charges big fees, they say he's a grafter;
if he charges small fees, "he's not worth going after."
If he joins the church, "it's for an effect;"
if he doesn't join, "he's as wicked as heck."
But here's one fact we all must admit:
when we get into trouble, our lawyer is IT!

With thanks to Jacob a Stein for making me aware of this poem.
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